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Snoring Solutions.

April 20, 2016

It is estimated that 45% of the population snores and that 25% of the population are habitual snorers. How can dentists help solve the snoring problem? There are devices that can be made in a dental office that are worn at night to stop snoring. They work by bringing the lower jaw and tongue forward just enough to open the airway, which should cause the snoring to stop. If sleep apnea is part of the problem (of the habitual snorers, it is estimated that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 3 men have Obstructive Sleep Apnea ), it might be the case that these devices are not for you and that a CPAP machine is recommended. The only way to find out the correct solution for you is to spend a night in a sleep clinic. They will be able to find out how many apneic episodes you are having throughout the night. If you fall under a certain threshold, then the intra oral device might be all you need. Over that threshold, a CPAP machine is the only safe way to help. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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April 11, 2016

What defines a beautiful smile? As a dentist, I can look at your smile and can actually break it down mathematically to see if it fits into the textbook ideal. But really, that’s not important. Often times it’s a personal ideal. That brings me to todays topic. Closing spaces in the front. Sometimes spaces in the front can suit a person. More often than not, people prefer to have them closed. This can be done in more than one way, such as capping or veneering. Sometimes, simply bonding tooth coloured filling material to the sides of teeth can close up spaces. If done correctly, it can look natural, doesn’t involve drilling away any healthy tooth material, can be easily repaired if chipped, and best of all, can be done in one visit. It doesn’t work in every case (for example if the space is too wide or if the bonding makes the tooth look too wide for it’s length), but it’s certainly worth asking about if spaces have been making you self conscious about smiling. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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April 4, 2016

As we all age, some changes do occur to your teeth. One of them, unfortunately, is that they start to yellow. This happens for more than one reason. As we get older, our enamel starts to thin and the second layer of tooth, which is yellow, thickens and shows through more. As well, what we eat and drink over the years leaves stain behind and has a great effect on colour. Tea, coffee, red wine and smoking of any kind are the major culprits. If your generally happy with your smile, and it’s only the fading colour that has you concerned, ask the advice of your dentist as to what can be done. Perhaps bleaching is the right choice. There is more than one way to bleach (for example store bought bleach strips, take home kits with custom fit trays, in office ZOOM treatment ) so make sure you get all the information you need, including risks and expected outcomes of each, to make an educated decision. If it’s more than the just the colour that’s the issue, more complex treatment options need to be discussed which may include moving teeth into a more pleasing alignment, porcelain veneers which can control shape and colour, etc. Next week, I will discuss how to close spaces between front teeth that some people find aesthetically displeasing. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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March 28, 2016
This past Sunday, Toronto Beach Dental had the privilege to Ride in the Toronto Beaches Lions Club Easter Parade. It was a gorgeous sunny day and the turnout was incredible. It was great to see many familiar faces of long standing patients, and even some new ones, as we passed the huge crowds. My entire family was present, as well as some staff, handing out toothbrushes, toothpaste and frisbees. It was great to see all those that participated. There were over 90 floats, marching bands and honour guards. The best part was seeing the kids reactions when they saw our tooth mascot sitting on top of our open jeep. Can’t wait for next year!
Dr. Jay Rabinovich
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March 15, 2016
Anxiety in the dental chair is nothing new. Innovations in dentistry have brought the profession so far forward that 99% of procedures should be pain and stress free. Still, for some, it’s difficult to relax when they’re in the office. Maybe rough experiences as a child, or issues with needles, linger and make going to the dentist more difficult that it needs to be. An option to consider is Nitrous Oxide, better known as ‘Laughing Gas’ . In a nutshell, laughing gas is inhaled through the nose during the appointment and creates a floating feeling that relaxes you. Generally it is in addition to freezing but can help out if you absolutely don’t want an injection. You’re awake the whole time and, when the appointment is over, you are placed on oxygen until you’re entirely clear headed. You don’t need anyone else to bring you to or take you from the office. It’s important to know it’s around if you need it. Speak to your dentist to see if it’s right for you and that there isn’t anything in your medical history that doesn’t allow you to have it.
Dr. Jay Rabinovich
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March 7, 2016

Everyday in the office I have at least one discussion with patients about implants. Often times people are a little unclear as to how they work. Essentially, your bone is like drywall. You don’t screw directly into drywall, you put a plug in first. Your bone is the same and the implant serves as the plug. It is threaded on the outside to grab the bone and hollow and threaded on the inside to accept a screw (or a screw in post, fastener, etc.). There are a myriad of ways to use implants in the mouth and a subject for a blog on its own. I’ll go over those in a later posting. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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March 1, 2016

I often am asked if older silver fillings should be replaced with newer white fillings. Sometimes the concern is cosmetic and other times it is regarding health. The health issue revolves around whether the mercury in silver fillings is a risk. Our office no longer places silver fillings, and hasn’t for years. There was a time in the past where silver fillings significantly outlasted white fillings. We don’t believe that is the case anymore, so we have eliminated mercury entirely from our practice. The question remains when to replace them if a patient already has them. The answer is yes to replace for the following reasons: If you have a known allergy or sensitivity to any of the components of silver fillings, if they are breaking down or have a cavity starting underneath them or if they are presenting a cosmetic issue. If they are holding up and not causing any issues, in general, we tend to watch them until one of the other criteria arises. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Of course, if you are concerned about the mercury content and want them removed, we would be happy to discuss the pros and cons of their removal and help you make an educated decision as well as discuss methods of reducing ingestion if we do decide to take them out. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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February 15, 2016

One of my earliest childhood memories is that of my father talking to me about an extraction he just had done at the dentist. I remember he complained for long after that the pain he had in the area did not get better from the treatment. It turned out that all he really needed was a night guard to control his clenching habit. I have a feeling he was not the only patient of his generation to be misdiagnosed. Clenching and/or grinding must always be considered if there is no obvious other cause for what the patient is experiencing. There may be nothing wrong with the tooth itself, but the nerves that surround tooth are being compressed by the habit. This could potentially lead to temperature sensitivity and/or discomfort to chewing, among other symptoms. Stop compressing the tooth in it’s socket and the issues resolve themselves. That’s what night guards are designed to do (not to mention protecting your jaw joints, potentially relieve morning headaches, etc., which I will touch on another time). Clenching or grinding might not be the reason for your problem(s), but it must be considered part of the thought process. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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February 1, 2016

Why do some people get cavities and others do not? There are many factors involved, but the three main ones are genetics, oral hygiene and of course, sugar consumption. A lot of people don’t understand that it’s not just about how much sugar (whether it’s refined like in candy or pop or natural like in fruits) you consume but also how you consume it. By that I mean, it is much better to eat a package of candy in one quick sitting as opposed to having a little all day long. To understand why, you need to understand why a cavity forms in the first place. The sugar you eat is also consumed by the bacteria in your mouth. When they do so, they produce acid as a byproduct, which in turn increases the acidity of your mouth. You’ll only get a cavity if the acidity in your mouth stays high for a critical amount of time. If you eat all your sweets quickly, you give your mouth a chance to buffer the acid. If you have a small amount of sugar all day long, your mouth never gets a chance to recover, the acidity stays high for that critical amount of time, and a cavity may form. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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January 28, 2016

Can you brush your teeth too much? I get this question all the time. I don’t think you can brush or floss too much, but you can definitely do yourself harm if you brush or floss INCORRECTLY too much.  The main thing you want to avoid is creating recession by being too aggressive. We will all get ‘long in the tooth’ over time, but scrubbing the sides of your teeth will cause your gumline to recede quicker than mother nature intended. So you must brush properly. Scrub the biting surfaces of your teeth all you want. They are covered in enamel and you will do no harm. But on the sides, brush away from the gumline only as if you’re trying to bring the gum tissue up towards the biting surface. As far as floss is concerned, gently saw the floss through the contact, slide the floss between the gum and tooth (there are two teeth to clean at each spot), and gently wipe the soft plaque off the tooth surface. You can’t be too clean, but you can be too aggressive. Dr. Jay Rabinovich

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